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Equine Sinus Draining Saves Horse From Bad Breath And Runny Nose

The sinuses are air-filled cavities within the head of the horse. The sinuses also accommodate some of the maxillary premolar and molar tooth roots (upper cheek teeth), facilitate passage of facial nerves, and extend around (above and below) the horse’s eyes and end around the facial crest. Sinusitis refers to inflammation or infection of one or more of the paranasal sinuses, and is the most commonly encountered disease of the paranasal sinuses.

 

It is classified as either primary or secondary, and acute or chronic. Primary sinusitis is defined as infection in the sinus as the result of a bacterial infection invading the lining of the sinus that causes a buildup of pus within the sinus. What you are going to watch is a graphic video of a horse on whom a sinus draining is being performed.

We have to thank God for our vets and farriers who know so much and save our horses from terrible conditions like this one. The video was posted on Facebook by Nantwich Equine Vets with the following description: “Primary sinusitis. Thought you might all like a look at this video, of what happens when a horses’ sinus drainage slit gets blocked or the discharge (snot!) is too thick to get out.

This horse had mild one sided intermittent but not smelly discharge and we were surprised at how much mucopus was in there! Even though we could see a significant amount on xray. A trephine hole gives excellent access and amazingly well tolerated especially in this site and heals quickly when catheter is removed.” Even though the video is graphic it gives us an insight on how it is to have a primary sinusitis. Watch the video!

Equine sinus draining

Primary sinusitis Thought you might all like a look at this video, of what happens when a horses' sinus drainage slit gets blocked or the discharge (snot!) is too thick to get out. This horse had mild one sided intermittent but not smelly discharge and we were surprised at how much mucopus was in there! Even though we could see a significant amount on xray.A trephine hole gives excellent access and amazingly well tolerated especially in this site and heals quickly when catheter is removed

Posted by Nantwich Equine Vets on Thursday, October 18, 2018

About Tony Grassy

Tony Grassy is Senior Writer for Horses World. Done a tremendous amount of work to curate engaging and relevant content for the page's audience.

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